• Nano-Enabled Water Technologies

Invited SpeakersProfile Details

Prof. Gregory Lowry
Prof. Gregory Lowry Dr. Lowry is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.His current research focuses on safely harnessing the unique properties of engineered nanomaterials for applications in remediation, water treatment, and food production.

Biography

Dr. Lowry is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He earned his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of California at Davis, M.S. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Stanford University. His current research focuses on safely harnessing the unique properties of engineered nanomaterials for applications in remediation, water treatment, and food production. He recently served on the National Academy of Science Committee on “Science Breakthroughs 2030: A Strategy for Food and Agricultural Research”, and he previously served on the National Research Council committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental Health and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials. He served as the founding Associate Editor of Environmental Science: Nanofor five years (2013-2018), and is on the editorial board forEnvironmental Science: Nanoand Nature: Scientific Data. Dr. Lowry has received awards from the ASCE (Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Award), AEESP (Malcolm Pirnie/AEESP Frontiers in Research Award), and ACS (Best Feature Article in ES&T for 2012). He was recognized as a highly cited researcher (top 1%) in the area of environment and ecology by Thompson Reuters in 2014 and 2015. Dr. Lowry has served as PI or Co-PI on grants from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and industry.

All sessions by Prof. Gregory Lowry

  • Day 2Tuesday, January 29th
Theme Five: Nano for food, agriculture and resource recovery
1:30 pm

Plant Nanobiotechnology for Sustainable Agriculture

Incomplete understanding of how a nanomaterial’s properties control its activity, fate, and bioavailability in plants and soils hinders development of novel nano-enabled applications, e.g. CeO2 for managing stress or CuO/ZnO NPs for supplementing plant nutritoin. My current research aims to develop a more fundamental understanding of how the properties of nanomaterials can be engineered to promote uptake and phloem loading in foliar applications, and how nanomaterial, soil, and plant properties together affects nanomaterial transformation, fate, and bioavailbility/toxicity in plants. Using synchrotron X-ray analysis, the spatial distribution and speciation of metal and metal oxide NPs in live plants is used to determine how the nanomaterial properties influence their foliar and root uptake, and their translocation to other parts of the plant. Overall, the body of evidence to date indicates great potential for manipulating nanomaterial properties for beneficial applications in agriculture and for increasing agrochemical utilization efficiency and sustainability of food production.

Auditorium between bldg. 4 & 5, level 0 13:30 - 14:00 Details